Fake News Will Trick Anybody Fake News. How do you understand what’s true?

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You might have failed to report current events to someone. But that is not your fault. This is not your fault.

Also today’s tsunami of political information can hardly be used for the most well-meaning news users. Most people use media in an automatic, unconscious state with so much information available–similar to the fact that you have driven home but are not able to remember the journey.

This allows you to consider false claims more prone.

But you can build patterns to manage your news consumption more carefully as the 2020 elections approach. In a course on media literacy, I teach those techniques to students to help them in four simple steps to become more knowledgeable news consumers.

  • Find your own news on politics

You would probably receive quite a few news from apps, blogs and social media like Twitter, Facebook, Reedit, Apple News, and Google, like most people. You ought to change it.

These are businesses of telecommunications, not news outlets. They strive to optimize your time with advertising revenue on their sites and apps. To order to achieve that, your browsing history uses their algorithms to show news that you agree with and like to keep you involved as far as possible.

Instead, social media will feed you on what you believe will be yours, instead of delivering the most important news of the day. This is typically filtered algorithmically and may send you biased political knowledge, misrepresentations or material you saw before.

Visit trustworthy news and blogs daily instead. Such organizations, generally in the sense of promoting public interest, actually produce news. You will see a broader range of political knowledge there, not just the news curated for you.

  • Use fundamental math

Distrustworthy news reports and political campaigns frequently make false statements using figures–believing that most people will not take the time to check the facts.

Simple math, which scholars call Fermi estimates or rough estimates, will allow you to spot falsified information better.

For example, 10.150 Americans were falsely claimed “killed by illegal immigrants,” a widely distributed hoax, in 2018. Surface it’s difficult to check or degrade that, but a way to begin is to see how many murders were committed in the United States in 2018.

Among other items, FBI report on violent crime can be found in killing numbers. In 2018, 16,214 murders in the U.S. were reported. If the statistic of the meme was right, it indicates that the supposed “illegal immigrants” were responsible for nearly two-thirds of American murder.

First, discover how many people lived illegally in the U.S. Most news reports and estimates indicate that this group has approximately 11 million men, women and children–just 3% of the 330 million people living in the country.

Only 3% of individuals committed 60% of U.S. killings? You can see these numbers just not added with a little bit of research and quick math.

  • Caution about non-political stereotypes

News media are often accused of supporting political inclinations that support either liberal or conservative views. Yet disinformation campaigns often take advantage of less evident cognitive prejudices. For example, people are inclined to underestimate costs or seek information that confirms what they believe already. The preference for simple sound bites that often fail to capture the nature of important problems is an important factor for press audiences. Studies has shown that fake news stories are more likely than true media reporting to use short, nontechnical and repetitive language.

Be vigilant also about the propensity of humans to believe what’s before your eyes. Video content is seen as more credible–even if deep fake videos can be quite deceptive. Think critically of how exactly you decide something. It should not be important that you see–and hear –. Be just as suspicious of video material as text and media, and verify all information from a trusted source by using news.

  • Think over and above the Presidency

The end result was a shift to national news at the detriment of local and international topics. The latter was a change in the concentration of news audiences. White House leadership is definitely important, but national news is only one of the four information categories that you need this election season.

Informed voters identify and relate issues at 4 levels: personal interests–like a local sport team or costs for health care, local news, national policy, and global affairs. You can help judge your arguments about all others by understanding a little about each of these fields.

Better understanding of trade negotiations with China, for example, can provide insight into why employees are picketing at a nearby manufacturing facility that might eventually affect the prices paid for local goods and services.

You might have failed to report current events to someone. But that is not your fault. This is not your fault.

Also today’s tsunami of political information can hardly be used for the most well-meaning news users. Most people use media in an automatic, unconscious state with so much information available–similar to the fact that you have driven home but are not able to remember the journey.

This allows you to consider false claims more prone.

But you can build patterns to manage your news consumption more carefully as the 2020 elections approach. In a course on media literacy, I teach those techniques to students to help them in four simple steps to become more knowledgeable news consumers.

  • Find your own news on politics

You would probably receive quite a few news from apps, blogs and social media like Twitter, Facebook, Reedit, Apple News, and Google, like most people. You ought to change it.

These are businesses of telecommunications, not news outlets. They strive to optimize your time with advertising revenue on their sites and apps. To order to achieve that, your browsing history uses their algorithms to show news that you agree with and like to keep you involved as far as possible.

Instead, social media will feed you on what you believe will be yours, instead of delivering the most important news of the day. This is typically filtered algorithmically and may send you biased political knowledge, misrepresentations or material you saw before.

Visit trustworthy news and blogs daily instead. Such organizations, generally in the sense of promoting public interest, actually produce news. You will see a broader range of political knowledge there, not just the news curated for you.

  • Use fundamental math

Distrustworthy news reports and political campaigns frequently make false statements using figures–believing that most people will not take the time to check the facts.

Simple math, which scholars call Fermi estimates or rough estimates, will allow you to spot falsified information better.

For example, 10.150 Americans were falsely claimed “killed by illegal immigrants,” a widely distributed hoax, in 2018. Surface it’s difficult to check or degrade that, but a way to begin is to see how many murders were committed in the United States in 2018.

Among other items, FBI report on violent crime can be found in killing numbers. In 2018, 16,214 murders in the U.S. were reported. If the statistic of the meme was right, it indicates that the supposed “illegal immigrants” were responsible for nearly two-thirds of American murder.

First, discover how many people lived illegally in the U.S. Most news reports and estimates indicate that this group has approximately 11 million men, women and children–just 3% of the 330 million people living in the country.

Only 3% of individuals committed 60% of U.S. killings? You can see these numbers just not added with a little bit of research and quick math.

  • Caution about non-political stereotypes

News media are often accused of supporting political inclinations that support either liberal or conservative views. Yet disinformation campaigns often take advantage of less evident cognitive prejudices. For example, people are inclined to underestimate costs or seek information that confirms what they believe already. The preference for simple sound bites that often fail to capture the nature of important problems is an important factor for press audiences. Studies has shown that fake news stories are more likely than true media reporting to use short, nontechnical and repetitive language.

Be vigilant also about the propensity of humans to believe what’s before your eyes. Video content is seen as more credible–even if deep fake videos can be quite deceptive. Think critically of how exactly you decide something. It should not be important that you see–and hear –. Be just as suspicious of video material as text and media, and verify all information from a trusted source by using news.

  • Think over and above the Presidency

The end result was a shift to national news at the detriment of local and international topics. The latter was a change in the concentration of news audiences. White House leadership is definitely important, but national news is only one of the four information categories that you need this election season.

Informed voters identify and relate issues at 4 levels: personal interests–like a local sport team or costs for health care, local news, national policy, and global affairs. You can help judge your arguments about all others by understanding a little about each of these fields.

Better understanding of trade negotiations with China, for example, can provide insight into why employees are picketing at a nearby manufacturing facility that might eventually affect the prices paid for local goods and services.

Big companies and large disinformation campaigns have a major effect on the facts you see and generate real and persuasive misrepresentations. This is not your fault, but it can put you back in charge if you are aware of those processes.

Big companies and large disinformation campaigns have a major effect on the facts you see and generate real and persuasive misrepresentations. This is not your fault, but it can put you back in charge if you are aware of those processes.

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